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LGBT equality

We strongly urge all Senators to pass Bill C-16 without amendment. Because human rights must apply to everyone -- acceptance and inclusion is not reserved only for those who are like us. Trans and gender diverse people face discrimination, harassment and violence in many aspects of their lives.
I am often reminded of Martin Luther King, who uniquely demonstrated that eloquence trumps bigotry, when researching Canada's earliest LGBT activists. They, like King, were at the forefront of a dramatic civil rights movement, making powerful and persuasive arguments for social justice in the face of sometimes brutal suppression.
Throughout most of history, homosexuality or lesbianism was so taboo that it was kept well hidden from public view. No wonder such forms of carnal or romantic pleasure were referred to as "the love that dare not speak its name." In reality, however, society was anything but mute on the topic.
A minority is defined as dangerous by a segment of society that clings to traditional views of acceptability. They fail to recognize prejudices inherent in their views until a hard-won fight for equal rights and shifting zeitgeist forces them to move on, foisting their fears on the next marginalized group.
Consider the butterfly effect. Wings flap and set off a hurricane. Canada's most dramatic civil rights movement was set in motion by one man who quietly and privately pursued his carnal pleasures. His libido ignited a chain of events that continue to profoundly shape and redefine sexual, gender and cultural identities today. The butterfly in question was a mechanic named George Klippert.
Sport and recreation is something we're all exposed to -- from gym class as children, to swim class as seniors -- sport has the potential to lift people up and bring us together. But for many, recreational sport can also be the first time they experience exclusion and discrimination.
The truck driver tells us to trust him (apparently, this was enough for us to believe that he wasn't a serial killer) and opens up the back of the truck. And of course, anytime the back of a truck opens, you're obliged to look in. Sure enough, costumes. An abundance of them, along with heels I made sure to take note of and purchase later on.
Do your children know what equality means? Let's celebrate International Youth Day by helping our children to become the citizens we want them to be. Let's teach them to think critically about rights and freedoms so they can grow up to be the fair-minded people we need in this world.
Part of the difficulty of getting older is in discovering how very wrong you were in your younger years -- and how much you