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linkedin

Canadians are increasingly attracted to employers with recognizable brands.
Canada has been churning out new finance jobs, even as the U.S. has been losing them.
San Francisco, New York and L.A. are the top destinations for Toronto talent.
LinkedIn is being corroded by the abuse of this feature. It's not intended to be used as nonchalantly as Facebook likes. Its purpose is to provide a professional, legitimate endorsement of someone for whom you would actually write a recommendation letter.
The ranking is based on salary, job growth and career advancement.
I love the conversations it has sparked about how people got started in their careers, and it seems entirely apropos as we barrel into "back to school" season next month. What perfect timing to think about how you can set yourself up for success, even before you graduate.
The desire to have better, stronger communications with one another at all times often fuels progress, but are we taking full advantage of the technology at our fingertips? As our capabilities evolve, we also create opportunities for improvement.
When faced with any decision, always ask first, "What would Future Me choose?" That's how you get to where want to go. By making decisions not from where you are, but from that place of your envisioned success.
More than half of all Canadians use LinkedIn for job search and a whopping 97 per cent of recruiters are active on the site. But if that's all you're using it for, you may be holding yourself back. You don't need to be on the hunt for a new job to gain value from LinkedIn -- it can also help you grow within your current role.
In a world of selfies and sharing photos of what we're eating for breakfast, it's strange that we still hold back from promoting ourselves: 53 per cent of Canadian professionals admitted that talking about their achievements feels like they're bragging, while 55 per cent said they'd rather talk about their colleagues' achievements than their own.