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Manitoba Election

With over a year and a half to work, a new leader could have righted the ship, made this election competitive, saved the careers of dozens of MLAs and perhaps even have won government. What Greg Selinger likely counted on at the time, despite seeing these numbers, is what we saw during the last election, and what historically happens in Manitoba.
"An important part of work, of life, of politics is showing up."
I watched the new Manitoba NDP ad this morning with some interest and after a few seconds I realized I have seen this ad before. Back in 2011, then-Premier Dalton McGuinty looked like he was about to lose a looming election, the polls were bad, his approval numbers were terrible -- sound familiar?
They head to the polls in April.
Last September, while swimming against a tidal wave of negative public opinion, I predicted the BC Liberal Party led by Premier Christy Clark would win the May 2013 election. Understandably, most readers scoffed. I can assure you that I am no Nostradamus. Don't bother asking me which stock to pick or what the 649 Lottery numbers will be. Rather, I relish being a contrarian. It is my nature to question the prevailing view on a range of topics - politics in particular - and to hopefully stir intelligent debate.
For the first time since Confederation, the once mighty Liberal Party of Canada was neither the government or official opposition. Layton became the first New Democrat to be sworn in as Her Majesty's Official Leader of the Opposition, another historic moment brought to us by May 2nd's election.
Perhaps the most common misconception is that young Canadians lack faith in democracy. Anyone who believes this simply hasn't looked at the evidence. Youth have just as much (or little) faith in our democratic process as their parents' generations, and it doesn't explain the difference in voter turnout.
I wasn't too busy. I didn't forget. I wasn't even one of those principled abstainers who dutifully spoil a ballot in vague protest. I just didn't bother voting. I know my view is not popular, but I doubt I'm the only one.
Whether or not the NDP deficit reduction plan is manageable, failing to offer an alternative plan along the same timeline was a missed opportunity for the Tories. With chaos caused by out of control public debt in Europe and the U.S., it is hard to imagine that a party pledging to prolong deficits is fiscally responsible.