Mark Jaccard

"It's pretty clear this issue is warming up politically."
The world has changed, one analyst says.
In a recent panel discussion, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna assured Albertans that the Liberal government would not risk damaging "national unity" by acting quickly on climate change. For some, her comment begs the question: when exactly will the Liberals be ready to start acting on their emissions reductions targets?
For more than two decades, Mark Jaccard has been penning "report cards" about Canada's environmental track record. The results haven't been pretty. His annual evaluations were harnessed in the mid-2000s by Stephen Harper as arguments for why the Conservatives deserved a shot at governing the country. Jaccard's latest report card, released on October 6, concludes the Conservative Party has since "implemented virtually no policies that would materially reduce emissions" despite making significant emissions pledges for 2020 and 2050. Jaccard concludes the absence of such actions shows "they must have had no intention" of dealing with climate change.
EDMONTON — The furor over a New Democrat candidate's remarks about leaving Alberta's oilsands in the ground reflects how
Facing criticism in the lead up to the U.N. Climate Summit, which prime minister Stephen Harper did not attend, the Harper Government released a new public outreach campaign through Environment Canada. Already critics are pointing to the apparent disparity between the Environment Canada campaign and Canada's waning reputation on the international stage.
Canada needs a moratorium on new oilsands projects and pipelines, says a group of Canadian and U.S. academics. In a comment
Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver attended the East Coast Energy Conference last week, where he said: "Canada is emerging
WASHINGTON - A former Harper government appointee used a keynote speech at a Washington event Monday to trample Canadian
The world's leading scientists agree that carbon pollution from burning these fuels is rapidly heating the planet. This scientific reality creates a challenge for people still bent on increasing carbon pollution for self-enrichment: they need to convince us that the bad they are perpetrating is somehow good.