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mass transit

On December 7th, Premier Wynne was joined by four of her cabinet colleagues for an announcement about a unique agreement for "Community Benefits" for the Eglinton Crosstown transit project. The room was crowded with representatives from Metrolinx, the builder, community groups and unions.
They are small cities that create employment for thousands of people, from air traffic controllers and baggage handlers, to pilots and taxi drivers. Without connectivity, getting to and from flights becomes an issue, but getting to and from work can be an even bigger challenge.
Thanks to former Prime Minister Paul Martin, I think we've all been conditioned to think that balanced budgets are very good things. But not all deficits are bad. It is prudent or even smart to slash and scrap into a surplus like Stephen Harper has done. Especially considering that Canada's infrastructure deficit is estimated at nearly $400 billion -- and growing.
Ontario announced $1.6 billion funding for the Hurontario LRT. Given the unmet transit demand in the City of Toronto, it is odd that the transit billions are being targeted at the suburban 905-ers. If ridership should be the primary consideration for prioritizing transit investments in Ontario, how does Hurontario LRT fare?
The Vancouver Mayor's Council on Regional Transportation has an ambitious 30-year vision (starting with a 10-year plan) that would dramatically expand mass transit in Vancouver. Yet recent developments in personal transportation raise questions about long-term plans to build fixed point-to-point transit systems.
On an average weekday, 1.6 million people use public transit to navigate Canada's largest city, relying on the Toronto Transit Commission's four subway lines, 11 streetcar routes, and more than 140 bus routes to reach their destinations. Writer Dominic Ali spoke with University of Toronto expert Matti Siemiatycki about where Toronto's transit has been and where it's heading.
While the leading candidates for Toronto's mayoral elections -- Olivia Chow, David Soknacki, Karen Stintz, and John Tory -- were unanimous in realizing that mobility was the number one issue for the City. The transit plans they revealed had one thing in common: they only have partial solutions and pet projects for Toronto's mobility troubles.
The reality is that the Ontario NDP caucus has publicly declared their support for raising revenue to fund transit. Their leader is going against the express, public declarations of her caucus. Andrea Horwath isn't just abdicating the legacy of the NDP, reneging on the Party's long-standing commitment to transit -- she's asking her MPPs to break public pledges and go along with her abdication of leadership.
WASHINGTON -- In early 2011, Elizabeth Miller, a bus driver for the Port Authority in Pittsburgh, received notice that she