Matthew Kellway

For 40 years or so, the economic forces of this global economy have reshaped, physically and socially, too, cities around the world and even delivered some, once mighty, into bankruptcy. Witness Detroit. Here in Toronto, vast expanses of our car-oriented post-war suburbs have become food, transit and social service deserts with scarce opportunity for employment,
I've been to a lot of doors this summer. At some point early in the conversation I ask, "Do you follow federal politics?", or some variation on that theme. Some say, "Yes." These are the brave souls who dare, the political junkies who can't help but watch, or the very hardened. Most say, "No." With little deviation, virtually all tell me that what time they're prepared to give over to politics is given to municipal politics.
We haven't needed an airport north of Pickering in the last 40 years; we don't need one now. But the issue is bigger than that. The GTA will continue to grow. But it must do so sustainably. To our inevitable demise do we go if we destroy that which sustains us. Our farmlands sustain us.
The jet lag has passed and the Christmas decorations (for some of us at least) are put away in storage. With 2013 stretching out before us, let's reflect on the year that was 2012 in Canadian politics. The best and worst political stories, the best and worst politicians and the biggest sellout.