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Media criticism

The problem is that, by monochromatically portraying Fidel Castro simply as a brutal dictator -- full stop -- the western media has had to do pretzel-twists to explain away the reality of why so many people in Cuba, Latin America and, indeed, much of the developing world do see him as an heroic, larger than life figure, whose passing is a cause for sadness while his legacy is reason for celebration.
To all those that derided the supporters of Trump and even Sanders, who called them despicable (Trump) or idealistic (Sanders), who dismissed them as impractical or racist -- change your ways, or at least your thinking. The "great unwashed" are marching. And they're angry.
Having just returned from Rio in a regular airplane seat and not in a body bag, I am pleased to say that we had a fabulous time and are the proud parents of a rugby sevens medal holder. Yes, Rio has problems of major proportions -- including a soaring murder rate and grinding poverty. But let's look at the positive side.
In my opinion, the media has a responsibility for helping to push social justice issues forward. While we should always be remembered for how we lived and not how we died we need to call a spade a spade. Let's take away the fear and stigma out of talking about suicide.
It has been 25 years since the Montreal Massacre and women still face gender inequality. According to journalist and filmmaker Francine Pelletier, women face two major obstacles: violence against women and hypersexualization. Yet there are signs that feminism is no longer a dirty word.
I started to wish I was white. I didn't necessarily want to not be Chinese. I just wanted to look like the celebrities in the movies I watched. The online outrage at the casting of Quvenzhané Wallis in the titular role in Annie, and the simultaneous approval or silent passivity at that of Jake Gyllenhaal as the lead in The Prince of Persia, Rooney Mara as a Native American girl in Pan and Scarlett Johansson as a Japanese woman in Ghost in the Shell teaches people of colour that being white opens doors that'll always be closed to us. While I'm glad to see that people are more outspoken about diversity nowadays, there are bodies like the Academy that continue to try and mute their voices. This is inadequate for our multicultural society.
How can I keep silent, in spite of level-headed advice to do just that, in the wake of last week's media circus around an unimportant statement I made about the absence of my film from the Oscars. There seems to be a certain maneuver that's foolproof when it comes to non-news. I think it goes something like this: if an artist says that "not having the chance to participate is ostracizing," you can't get any mileage on that; better to say he feels ostracized, which makes him into more of a victim. The most extraordinary response to this letter, whose content is publicly available in its entirety, unaltered and unedited, would be total silence, oddly enough.
Why hasn't my Facebook feed filled with at least the same level of indignation about our government's disgraceful treatment of our Veterans as it was about the a tobogganing hill? We must learn to calibrate our anger so it's proportional to the injustice or slight. Let's fight for the things that make life fun for us like tobogganing while also fighting the things that make life miserable such as payday loan companies, multinational corporations, venture capitalists, a failed War on Terrorism and the self-serving hacks in the media and government who enable it all.
You're wrong about Canada. NBC, Global TV, CNN, ABC, on the news and on the screens. We've been through a lot since October 22, collectively, as a country. But how can you stand and say that we've lost our innocence, how can you print it like a litany, false sympathy for our tears?
If the theory that the executions were faked by Hollywood (and that the journalists were alive) seem far-fetched, it illustrates the ideological line of the network as the influence of Qatar's royalty, the founders of the TV station, can be felt as they may not view an American intervention against the Islamic State favourably.