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medical research

For too long, TB patients and care providers have been fighting a protracted battle with antiquated, inefficient tools, diagnostics, vaccines and drug regimens.
There is still a long way to go if women with ovarian cancer are to experience meaningful improvements in outcomes.
It's a huge discovery.
The statistics may differ from disease to disease, but the challenges with clinical trial participation are seen across the spectrum of medical research. Any delay a study faces due to difficulty in finding participants, leads to a huge waste of resources, money and most importantly time. Without enough volunteers to participate in medical research the development of better treatments and ultimately a cure for the myriad of diseases that impact us all, will not be possible.
If you're not arrogant enough to believe that you know or recall everything that might be important, and you're willing to consult other authoritative sources, you may actually be more accurate and effective as a result.
The 23,500 square foot production facility in Paris, Ontario started off early in cultivation. As soon as their license to grow was granted, work began straight away. As part of a fully integrated medical marijuana and health care company, high standards must be held to carry on business under the regulations.
The penultimate upgrade for humanity would be a perfect synthesis of human and machine -- superior to an entirely biological human, but possessing the same mind in this new hybridized frame. So what does this have to do with transgender people?
Collaboration itself is not a new word, but for the world of cancer research it's an innovative approach. My view is that we need to collaborate to maximize investment and increase research capabilities. Personal interests such as profit, competition, rivalry or recognition need to be put aside.
They put processed meat into Group 1 -- "exposures known to be carcinogenic to humans." But categorization caused misunderstandings. The report simply put processed meat in the same category (Group 1) as cigarette smoking, but did not claim it was as dangerous as smoking.
Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) is a landmark pan-Canadian population health research platform that can be used to explore how genetics, environment, lifestyle and behaviour interact and contribute to the development of cancer and other chronic diseases. Researchers in Canada and around the globe now have access to health and lifestyle surveys and in the future will have the ability to link it to health outcome data and even biological samples like blood and toenail clippings.