HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

mental health issues

Over the years, I have noticed many instances where professionals felt that they were supposed to be above all of life's challenges and obstacles. Not just health care workers ignoring their own health; but leaders who feel stressed by circumstances beyond their control and who live in fear of being discovered so that they feel anxious and afraid.
Postpartum mood disorders are so much more than just depression. Anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, the blues, manic states and, more rarely, psychosis all make up the spectrum. My own experience parallels the experience of so many, and yet has its own unique complications.
"Fear, or reticence, or a sense of not wanting to burden another, means that people suffer in silence."
#TreatYoSelf
Another myth busted.
Anxiety is constant, it doesn't just go away. Sometimes it may be heightened... making it essential to learning self-regulation of my thoughts. This involves acknowledging my triggers, knowing what scenarios or environments may cause my anxiety or panic to heighten.
Whether it's a result of increased need, improved awareness or maybe both, millennials are asking for help in the form of access to mental health services that are often fragmented province to province and particularly difficult to access. Millennials are also most likely to be underinsured or have no insurance at all.
About a month ago, I went to see a psychiatrist. Earlier in the spring, I had visited my family doctor about another annoying little problem: my teeth seem to be very fragile and are breaking. I grind them at night, and even though I wear a night-guard, this doesn't seem to be protecting them from injury. Turns out, I have a mild anxiety disorder.
Next time that you feel your mind is going towards a negative path -- think about what makes you smile which will help put the negative thoughts in perspective. Take a walk, go to your favorite coffee shop around the corner, call your best friend or look at pictures of your dog on your phone.
Recovering from depression isn't a smooth one way process. There's lots of relapses. Relapses are okay. Relapses are part of depression. They are warning signals that you might be pushing yourself too much emotionally, mentally, physically, or spiritually. Relapses can be nasty, not just for you but people you care about. Having a good depression relapse safety net in place can limit the severity and duration of your relapse. Here's 5 ways to prep for a depression relapse.