HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

midlife crisis

If your husband is having a destructive midlife crisis, I encourage you to see the situation more objectively. You need to see it for the self-focused power play it can be. Because when one spouse's "crisis" creates a crisis in the life of the other spouse, or in the marriage, there comes a point when you need to wise up.
The thing is, people have never really figured out how to flip the script on the midlife crisis. They get twitchy, frantically trying to fulfill that missing piece inside with decorative pieces on the outside. It all seems so desperate, a process born out of material wants rather than a need to keep evolving as human beings.
Rooming houses and cheap basement apartments in my neighbourhood are full of people like that. One day, some of them just don't get up. This happens. Every day. But I made a choice a long time ago. I'm not going down without a fight. This past year I've tried to re-invent myself as a writer of a TV drama series.
But your 20s aren't so bad either.
Life may not begin at 40, but it's an excellent time to consider a second (or third, or fourth) act. Is there something you've always wanted to do? Something you were scared to try, because you'd be devastated if you failed? Take a deep breath and go for it. Trust me: it's way more satisfying than buying a convertible.
As a veteran self-improver, I find five-step solution articles almost irresistible. In that vein, I propose the following five (easy) ways to take the edge off your midlife crisis. There are undoubtedly harder and more radical ways to fix what ails you, such as therapy, divorce, quitting your job and so on. These suggestions are more in the nature of short-term triage -- and they work.