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milk

Snipping both ends may seem bizarre, but the science makes sense.
"The last thing anyone wants to see is their milk being discarded."
Research continues to reveal the downsides to consuming dairy.
The products are at risk for sanitizer contamination.
Skim milk may not be having the effect you expect.
American researchers have recently revealed one of the ingredients in milk may be necessary for the growth of Clostridium difficile bacteria.
Apart from sterilization, all treated milks eventually will go bad. Yet little research has been conducted to best understand how long milk will remain drinkable. This has left us relying solely on the best before date on the package to determine if we are risking a nasty mouthful.
After a year or two, organic hens are packed in plastic crates and trucked to the same slaughterhouses as their conventional counterparts. There, they will be turned into chicken nuggets and deli meat. Meanwhile, in organic as in conventional productions, male chicks will be systematically tossed into grinders at birth because they are deemed economically useless: they obviously do not produce eggs, and their genes aren't optimized for fast growth. Whether one eats the egg or the chicken, the problem remains the same.
Studies have shown our taste for foods is created by cultural and learned experiences as Petrini (2001), Duruz (2003), Bell
The truth is that after almost 20 years of practice as a dietitian, I've fallen into a place where I neither discourage nor encourage dairy. Eat it if you like it. Avoid it if you want. Despite what Canada's Food Guide says, you don't need dairy, but it's not likely to harm you, at least in moderate quantities. So let's have some fun debunking some myths about dairy.