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mindless eating

Mindless eating is not uncommon; in fact, it's something I discuss regularly with clients. And the good news is this: you don't have to be a zen master or nutrition guru to become a mindful eater, you just need to start with a few simple steps. Here are three tips to help you build your mindful eating practice.
The problem is that once people start eating larger portions on special occasions, they tend to continue doing so, although they may believe they are not. Insidiously, it becomes a regular habit that leads to ever-increasing food consumption year after year.
By nature, we are genetically programmed to eat whenever opportunity presents itself, presumably stemming from times when food was much scarcer than it is today. And although the "feast or famine" scenario is no longer as common as it used to be, our instinct for making the most of opportune encounters still exists and influences our behaviour.
If you feel caught in an endless cycle of mindless or emotional eating, you can take steps to conquer it. Here are a few suggestions to curb emotional eating and establish healthy habits that nourish you from the inside out.
What is more likely to cause overeating -- a quick bite on the run or a sit-down meal in a relaxed atmosphere? Surprisingly, it's the rushed eating event that most often seduces us to overindulge. Why? For a number of reasons, most of which we are completely unaware of, according to scientists who study our eating behavior.
Passion and hard work are recurring themes when you ask people how they achieve their success. Supporting your inner champion with an optimistic mindset is also key. As the Winter Olympics begin in Sochi, Russia it's a great time to reflect on your own fitness and nutrition goals and aspirations.
Here's the thing about meal plans: they are absolutely genius -- and practically fool proof -- when adherence is strict. When one fails to plan to follow their plan, however, by say, not doing their weekly food prep or pulling into a drive-thru when hunger strikes, the results they are searching for get further and further away.
By and large, Canadians are a society of rapid eaters. We power eat and then dash off, bypassing the time-consuming part of the meal: enjoying the flavours. Dinner hour is melting down to dinner five minutes as our behinds get bigger and bigger.