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mining

Companies operating in foreign countries can be held liable under international law back home, Canada's top court has ruled.
Companies could rethink their investments after spending billions.
NORCAT runs the only mining research and development centre in the world that operates an underground test facility. As Duval
Kapuskasing and many other resource-based communities in Canada's north face a very uncertain future.
Mining companies headquartered in Canada have been implicated in human rights violations around the world, some involving egregious abuses like sexual violence, forced displacement and extrajudicial killings.
We cannot spend tens of millions of dollars promoting a low carbon future while also spending tens of millions promoting extractives. With the Agreement in full force, Canada can pivot its approach to international assistance to reflect real policy coherence. We need to support small-scale, decentralized clean energy programs that promote pro-poor, gender sensitive projects.
Mining and clean energy don't share obvious common ground. Take centuries of environmental devastation -- add coal -- and mineral extraction has a dirty reputation. Indeed, profit-driven boardrooms seldom prioritize climate change considerations. But things are changing.
In seeking out concentrations of expertise in Canada, it is difficult to ignore the extractive sector. Given the (good and bad) history and size of this sector, and the lack of global rivals in the density of expertise (other than Australia), should international assistance not leverage this expertise to achieve a lasting impact in developing countries?
Mining jade is hard work, and it's no easy task to find the good stuff. We are four generations, happy to be making our livings in the jade mining industry -- and we have the fever alright! We didn't realize it would be so contagious, though.
Moose Cree has spent years using their laws to keep the river safe from resource development. But Ontario has yet to reciprocate and still keeps the watershed open for industrial activities such as mining under provincial laws. This is a recipe for conflict. Moose Cree's efforts to safeguard this river date back to 2002 when the community informed then MNR Minister Jerry Ouellette of the need for permanent protection. The minister rejected that request. The community persevered. Over the next 14 years they would face down mining and forestry companies.