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missing and murdered aboriginal women

This conversation might be new to you, but it's always been relevant and ongoing, and it's often a reaction of something your people have caused. It's often complicated by outsider intrusion and historical erasure.
It has been a year since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada released its final report, "Honouring the Truth, Reconciling the Future." It seemed like we finally had a government in Ottawa ready to listen and act. In the year since, we have seen the listening. Now we need to see the action.
The company says it was "a joke" between two drivers.
As pretty much the entire country watched The Tragically Hip live in Kingston, Ontario for their final show, Gord Downie used the opportunity to do something not many would...bring up First Nations issues to the prime minister himself.
Details of a long-awaited national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls are expected to be released
We can vote, and drive, and march on Parliament Hill without fear. But do we question the deep rooted inequalities that make it possible for Aboriginal women and girls to disappear without a trace, and without an outcry? Do we demand an end to the gender wage gap that has been stuck at around 72 per cent -- and hasn't budged in years?
Children globally have remained the most vulnerable population and even though we have learned trauma will continue to happen, and happen again in various forms when it is not acknowledged or treated, we keep exposing kids to physical, mental, emotional and sexual violence.
There has been a historic allocation of funding at levels the previous government did not have the courage or desire to put forward. Monies have been directed to the inequality of education on reserves, to housing, to an Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Women and Girls, to Child Welfare, and a number of other critical areas.
"If I go missing and the [Winnipeg Police Service] has not changed the behaviours I have brought to your attention, I beg of you, do not treat me as the indigenous person I am proud to be."
An interview with Clive Weighill - Saskatoon Police Chief and President of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police: Some politicians talk about getting tough on crime. I'm saying you don't just want to get tough on crime, you have to get tough on the issues of poverty, poor housing, disadvantage. People are products of their environment, and if we can't solve those social issues, we're not going to solve the big picture in the end. I firmly believe that we have to work on poverty.