Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Tina Fontaine was a 15-year-old First Nations girl found dead in 2014.
The commission has dealt with many staffing changes during its tenure.
Police had already declared Wood's death a homicide.
Wendy Carlick was an advocate for missing and murdered indigenous women.
"These individuals came to the house looking for someone else. I want to make that clear.''
An open letter says people are "deeply concerned" about the inquiry.
Our government has set aside $200-million this year to end discrimination against First Nations children in our child welfare system -- and Budget 2016 committed to increasing that amount for the next five years. Next year we are investing almost $250-million to end discrimination. But putting more money into the existing system simply isn't enough.
The justice system is clearly flawed, and it proves that police officers can get away with virtually anything. Instead of serving justice to the survivors, the system is openly protecting the perpetrators. It's also troublesome to see officers from the provincial police force launch a large lawsuit against Radio-Canada. Since when is it acceptable to go after journalists for uncovering the truths that plague our society?
Indigenous women and girls are at least three times more likely to experience violence than non-indigenous women and six times more likely to be murdered. On any given day, thousands of First Nations, Inuit and Métis women and children are living in emergency shelters to escape abuse (though on-reserve shelters remain woefully underfunded).
Advocates say there are more than 1200 missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada, but these stories seldom garner national press. And Indigenous women in the provinces report a rate of violent victimization that is about 2.5 times higher than the rate for non-Indigenous women. We spoke with two Indigenous advocates and experts about what we should be talking about when it comes to sexual violence and Indigenous communities.