mistakes

When something goes wrong it can be handled with grace, style, and class; or it can be handled with blame, finger pointing, and a definite lack of class. Late Sunday night at the 2017 Academy Awards show we saw a little of both as the Best Picture award was given to the wrong film.
"Silence opens the door to hearing dialogue, rare and valuable in breaking stories," says Brady Dennis of The Washington
I wish I had followed this advice years ago; it would have given me a huge headstart on my pursuit of happiness. But I know it now, and I'm passing it on to you. After many years as a psychologist committed to making New Yorkers' lives happier, I've arrived at the conclusion that the single best piece of advice for finding greater happiness
Making mistakes when speaking or writing a new language is not the same as making other kinds of mistakes, at least not to me. Making mistakes in language learning is not only necessary, it is a good sign. If you are not making mistakes, you are not trying hard enough to use the language.
We're human, even at work. Which means that every now and again we're going to screw up. When that happens (and it will) apologize and do better next time. Not sure how to stumble through an apology at work? (Because... um, hello, awkward!) Here's how to get it right.
Do you know how many emails you get each day that you shouldn't be receiving? When I teach my time management programs, I ask this and very rarely does anyone know the answer. For those of you allergic to details you are probably wondering why these details matter. They matter because they add up to a more efficient use of your time.
The most important step is to accept that we are all human. We all make mistakes. We all mess up. In fact it is my belief that this is most likely the purpose to life. Mistakes are opportunities, but through these opportunities we grow and learn what we are made of and what we have to contribute.
The "Uh-oh! Moment" marks a realization, a grasp of a situation marked by despair and anguish. But it's within that grasp that most of the time, you start climbing out of the abyss. Once you're questioning what you have done, you start answering. And once you start answering, you start moving in a new, upward direction.
Children who are exclusively rewarded for right answers or who are shunned or punished for making mistakes may become afraid of trying new things. Children are more open to learning and more willing to try harder when they are praised and rewarded for their efforts, not their results.
A new study from Michigan State University shows people who think they can learn from their mistakes have a different brain reaction to errors than those who don't. Children who expect to make mistakes are much more willing to try new things and take on difficult tasks. As a result they're open to learning more both at school and in other environments.