HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

monsanto

The company is potentially exposed to thousands of lawsuits in the U.S.
Agritech companies have no real idea about the long-term impacts their actions are having on soil and its complex networks of microbes.
The devastating impacts on soil are increasingly clear to see. And what are these biocides doing to us as humans?
The push to commercialise the growing of genetically modified (GM) mustard in India is currently held up in court due to a lawsuit by Aruna Rodrigues. The next hearing is due in February. Rodrigues' claim is that, to date, procedures and tests have been corrupted by fraudulent practices, conflicts of interest and regulatory delinquency.
The ultimate irony (and hypocrisy) is that Christmas is now cheer-led and celebrated by a consumer capitalism whose corporations are destroying the environment through, for example, the genetic engineering of crops, the drenching of soil with agrotoxins and the eradication of indigenous cultures.
Occupation can take many forms. It does not necessarily imply a military presence or military domination. For example, in India right now, there is a drive to get genetically modified (GM) mustard sanctioned for commercial cultivation; this would be the first GM food crop to be grown in the country.
The decision whether to allow the commercialization of the first genetically modified (GM) food crop (mustard) in India is nearing. Serious conflicts of interest and outright fraud could mean the decision coming down in favour of commercialization.
Global corporations are engaged in a long-term attack on India's local cooking oil producers. In just 20 years, they have reduced India from self-sufficiency to importing half its needs. Now attempts to impose genetically modified mustard seed threaten to wipe out a crop at the root of Indian food and farming traditions.
It's not so much the Bayer-Monsanto deal is a move in the wrong direction (which it is), but increasing consolidation is to be expected given the trend in many key sectors toward monopoly capitalism or just plain cartelism, whichever way you choose to look at it.