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mood

I found myself struggling, and could not get off the hamster wheel. This is familiar territory for anyone grappling with stress. And am not talking about the good stress -- a type of mild stress that can inspire you to achieve a given task or goal. Am referring to its evil twin; the one that drags you down.
I stay on my fitness horse by reminding myself that movement is a privilege and that the future Me will ALWAYS be happier if I move. The understanding that exercise positively affects my mood has informed my entire fitness philosophy. In fact, improving my mood is typically the primary reason I train.
Scientists studying recovery from brain injury have shown that parts of our brains possess the ability to regenerate throughout adult life. Neurogenesis, the regeneration of brain cells, suggests that maybe an old dog can learn new tricks after all.
There's been lots of discussion recently about the gut microbiome, an ecosystem which consists of several hundred different species of bacteria. An imbalance in this ecosystem (an overgrowth or 'bad' bacteria or a lack of diversity), can lead to negative symptoms connected to a range of diseases, including autism, obesity, depression, anxiety, allergies, irritable bowel syndrome, asthma and other digestive and mental health issues.
Depression is a libido killer. Our brain is our most important sexual organ and a depressed brain may cause a complete loss of sexual interest and make it difficult, sometimes impossible, to get or sustain an erection or have an orgasm. As depression resolves, usually sexual dysfunction resolves as well.
You can do better than just setting up some mood lighting.
My sister suffers from depression and she has been prescribed several different antidepressant medications. While she feels marginally improved, her doctor is about to start her on a new drug to see if she can do better. Why is it so hard for some patients to find the "right" antidepressant?
SAD tends to present in adulthood and affects eight times more women than men. As we gain a deeper understanding of how circadian and seasonal rhythms are at play within our bodies, we will be better equipped to help patients combat wintertime blues and SAD. Here are six steps to get started.
Wellness isn't simply about getting enough exercise, eating our greens and ensuring that we have enough good-quality sleep. Wellness is also about paying attention to all the other things that constitute well-being: it's considering the toxins we're being exposed to every day.
Take advantage of curcumin, the substance that gives turmeric its bright yellow colour.