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mri

When I see patients, I try to understand what underlies their concerns, and how I can provide reassurance. And reassurance doesn't always come from ordering a test or treatment. In fact, sometimes a test or treatment may not be needed and can lead to harm.
Have you ever tried fooling a dog into getting excited for the wrong thing? Perhaps testing their instincts by offering something boring to the tune of a tasty treat? It turns out that while they may very well be excited by the amped up sound of your voice, they are most likely on to your trick.
We desperately need universal coverage for a full array of health care goods and services -- pharmaceuticals, mental health services, home care and out-of-hospital diagnostics. Canada is unique among OECD countries in the paucity of what it covers on a universal basis despite falling in the top quartile of countries in levels of per capita health spending.
The admission to the epilepsy unit lasts about a week, but can be longer in some circumstances. This hospital admission is often memorable and eye opening for patients as they meet other people with epilepsy and share stories with them and their families. They often realize that they are not alone.
Along with failing to increase affordability and access, private MRIs pose a more insidious threat to publicly-funded health care. The more Canadians believe that they have to pay out of their own pocket for necessary care, the more we will see confidence in and commitment to medicare eroded. We need strategies to improve access to diagnostic technologies that strengthen medicare rather than undermining it.
It's official. I'm a certified anosmiac. It means that my olfactory ability has disappeared. In short, I can't smell. Unlike the loss of one's vision or the loss of a limb, it's often difficult to pinpoint exactly when a smell-related disability began.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Medical professionals may soon have one more weapon in their arsenal against chronic lower back pain. In 2008, a team out of the University of Southern Denmark treated a small group of lower back pain sufferers with antibiotics. Over 60% of the patients showed improvement in their condition.
My mother's aneurysm was a shot across my bow. There's a chance I could develop a pocket of blood in my brain and I had just agreed to an MRI. Did I want to know if there was a ticking time bomb inside of me?
Canada gets top marks for freedom -- odd in a country where you can easily get a marijuana joint in most big cities, but not a private MRI scan