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muhammad

The history of crude antisemitism in cartoons began in Europe long before Israel's existence. That it continues to be carried forward today in Palestinian society and Muslim communities elsewhere is a scandal, one that should be condemned by all people of good will.
Peace means something else in Islam and it behooves us to negotiate peace respecting their definition. If we are going to abide by the belief that all cultures are equal then we must accept the views of those with whom we negotiate a priori when we sit down to discuss and hazard peace.
Most Canadians probably do not know what blasphemy is, let alone that publishing blasphemous materials is still a criminal offence in this country. But there is some irony here, because the Canadian government publicly defends the freedom to publish cartoons that mock a religious figure and looks abroad to protect religious minorities from oppression while at the same time punishing that at home.
The Paris offices of the satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdowere firebombed Wednesday, the same day the magazine released an issue caricaturing the Prophet Muhammad on its cover. This is not the first time that Charlie Hebdo's content has angered Muslims.