HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

mulcair ndp

With the House of Commons getting ready to close its doors for the summer, how have the main party leaders performed? In
MONTREAL — NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair may find himself challenged at the next federal election not only by Justin Trudeau
NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair rallied party delegates Saturday with a message designed to resonate with middle-class Canadians
NDP leader Tom Mulcair says he supports the idea of refining Alberta's oil in Canada instead of shipping the crude to Kitimat
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg The polls have spoken -- Stephen Harper is unpopular, and will surely be replaced in no time. But by whom? Thankfully the pundit brigade have lots of fun ideas -- Spoiler Alert: Probably Mulcair. That is, if the Tories' new attack ads against him don't get in the way. Although these televised attacks are a little lacklustre compared to the Conservatives' greatest hits.
Thomas Mulcair's prescription is to make "polluters pay" and that the natural resources industry should fully account for its pollution. And then what? How is that going to reduce pressure on the dollar? How does that help other industries? Does he want to implement a selective "polluter pays" policy that target only the natural resources sector and exclude the manufacturing sector?
B.C. Premier Christy Clark is firing back at federal NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, calling his stance on the oilsands "goofy." Clark
Earlier today, the Canadian Press Harris Decima survey revealed a surge for the federal NDP and its new centrist leader, Thomas Mulcair. For the NDP that once viewed Ed Broadbent's triumph of 43 seats in the Free Trade referendum like federal election of 1987, this must be an inspiring moment.
There seems to be consensus among political commentators that Thomas Mulcair is better placed than the leadership candidates he defeated to keep Quebec in the NDP fold. However, how much of the ability of the NDP to keep its Quebec seats is in Mulcair's hands?
Instead of reading Marx, Mulcair probably studies political polls. What does it all mean? Well, it means the stodgy, class warfare, Solidarity Forever NDP is gone forever, relegated like Edsels, mood rings and Nehru jackets to the dustbin of history. This time the question was: Who can beat Prime Minister Stephen Harper?