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mulcair ndp

So Thomas Mulcair is the new leader of the NDP. Now what? With the party's gains in Quebec now secure, at least for the time
The media seem obsessed with the difficulty of creating party unity and "healing the wounds" of the campaign. I really don't get a sense there will be a lot of wounds. The opportunity for growth will surely make the party put aside their differences and work together under Thomas Mulcair's leadership.
Mulcair, throughout his career, has displayed the Harper-esque confidence, stubbornness, and vitriol that can allow a supposed underdog to keep fighting until he wins -- as Harper did. Thomas Mulcair is not Stephen Harper, but, he may just be the closest thing the NDP has ever had to him.
Despite what many felt to be a downright dispirited speech at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on Friday, Thomas Mulcair
TORONTO — Thomas Mulcair takes over the leadership of the federal NDP with a surprisingly weak mandate after the membership
The real campaign being waged in a leadership race happens a long way away from the television debates and the convention floor. It's waged in community centres in Surrey B.C. and Longeuil, bars in Halifax and Biggar, and on the phone every day. The ground game is political trench warfare.
2012-03-23-NDPREAL2.jpgShould Thomas Mulcair lose the big race on Saturday, Monday's editorial pages will doubtlessly be filled with all manner of convoluted post-mortems as the punditocracy struggles to find the reason their golden boy's party turned against him.
If Mulcair doesn't win, the pundit class tells us that Quebec will go back to the Bloc and we'll be worse off than we were before. Is that even true? And how do all these calculations change if Bob Rae doesn't step down as planned? All I know is, I'm kind of glad I'm not voting in this one.
There is the possibility that a Mulcair-led NDP could open up space for the Liberals as the principled centre-left alternative. With Conservatives who see the federal government's role as more about building prisons and fighter jets than providing social programs, and an NDP beholden to separatist forces in Quebec, there is a worrying lack of national vision in Canadian politics.
Quebec MP Thomas Mulcair, the perceived front-runner in the race to replace the late Jack Layton as leader of the NDP, says