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music industry

Jung Joon-Young is accused of videotaping 10 or more women he had sex with without their consent.
Rumours had been circulating about the disgraced R&B kingpin when the group was starting out.
Canadian groups headed to America have two choices: Stump up $2000-$5000 in border fees and union dues and wait weeks for a permit, or go without and risk a two to five year personal ban from the US. Whether it's a one night show played for beer and beds or a full arena tour makes little difference to the costs and paperwork involved.
In thinking about what it was that made people love him so much, I came to the conclusion that it was because he was completely and utterly himself. He was always authentic to his vision and unafraid to do things exactly his way. He was someone who was truly free.
When Apple Music, Spotify and Tidal launched, they were hailed as digital prophets that promised new ways to monetize the experience. Thus far, their solutions have fallen short of fireworks. Just slightly over a quarter of Spotify's 75 million active users actually pay for the service. And, as The Guardian UK reports, despite pulling in €1.08 bn in revenue, its losses were €162.3m. So why are all these promising platforms sinking?
Sexual assault against women is rampant. Thousands of women are subject to it, every day, all over the world. Here in North America, where we pride ourselves on fairness and justice, women who make claims of sexual assault are often denied justice and even more often, they're raked over the coals by the lawyers of the men who've been accused.
The CBC is suffering from a series of funding cuts implemented by the federal government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper. The 2012 federal budget cut $115 million from the CBC over three years. While this has negative consequences for all Canadians as this national institution is forced to cut jobs and scale back its reach and scope, the country's music and arts communities, in particular, stand to lose. In many cases, it's already happening.
"No Pop" is about changing this self-imposed, self-perpetuating wheel of regulation and can do so without condescension toward the pursuit of monetary success. All that would need to, and should, change, is the perception of what makes music "commercial."
Nicki Minaj identified an industry preference for what is seen as attractive, acceptable and what should be rewarded. It shouldn't be surprising that black artists feel some type of way when their cultural influence is undeniable but remains unrecognized. It is, however, surprising that the industry that still makes money off the backs of black artists still doesn't take them seriously.
TORONTO - How much are Canadians willing to pay to stream music? It's a question that continues to flummox analysts, record