muslim radicalization

There is little talk of steering vulnerable people away from extremism, Zijad Delic told the Senate national security committee
My experience with mosques and imams suggests that Fatah and Mansur are way off base when they blame mosques rather than internet. They are entitled to their views and the right to express them. But I think it would be more productive if the authorities, Muslims and other Canadians seriously studied the causes of the radicalization of a few individuals and determine how this threat could best be countered for all Canadians to live in safety and harmony.
Muslims are justifiably worried that we'll be implicated in the crimes of these individuals. But Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was still a human being looking for support from both his Muslim and non-Muslim communities. And although we'll never know the truth, it seems he eventually found his support on the Internet, which preys on the marginalized in our society. People want moderate Muslims to speak out and decry radicalization. And they do, but tweets and press releases are not always the answer because they don't solve a very real societal problem. There are unwell people out there who need our help. And they are increasingly showing up in our mosques.
A former University of Calgary professor says he warned the school's administration years ago about the potential radicalization