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national energy board

Finance Minister Bill Morneau showed no sign of buyer’s remorse.
It means that someone finally listened to the overwhelming number of people across Canada who want to see real, serious climate action.
Last week the B.C. Liberal government approved the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project. They have stated that Kinder Morgan has met their five conditions and have added 37 new conditions with their approval. From the National Energy Board hearings, to the recent to governmental approval, the process was problematic right from the start. It was nothing more than a public relations exercise.
I am profoundly disappointed with the federal government's approval of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Expansion Project. As an intervenor in the National Energy Board (NEB) hearings, I witnessed first hand that the process was fundamentally flawed.
Don't forget, way back in January 2014 Trudeau said about Kinder Morgan, "I certainly hope that we're going to be able to get that pipeline approved." Unless we make things uncomfortable for him politically, the prime minister will force this pipeline through our communities against our will -- the public's will.
You read that right.
While it's so ridiculous that you can't help but laugh at it, it's also unjust, anti-democratic and something that Canada's new prime minister promised would never happen again. Last June, now-Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveiled his party's environmental platform standing with his back to the Burrard Inlet in Vancouver's Kitsilano neighborhood. With a withering critique that Stephen Harper's government had "chosen to be a cheerleader instead of a referee" when it came to pipelines, he promised a complete overhaul of the National Energy Board assessment process.
The Tory appointments kicked in only after the federal election.
The head of the National Energy Board, Peter Watson, as recently as July, said it's "just not our role" to look at greenhouse
The Harper government chose the Friday afternoon of a long weekend, just before an expected federal election, to controversially