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Native Americans

They're from the same retailer who made the sexy 'Handmaid's Tale' costume.
Indigenous people are subject to racism, whether they are professors, authors, award winners, self-made or struggling. Our voices won't be silenced. I say: name your culprits and give them the exposure they desire.
My op-ed 'Canada Ignores Its Own Refugees' was published in Toronto Star on January 4th, and was one of the most read articles
There are a lot of kind, educated, empowering and reasonable men in our communities, but sometimes they fail to acknowledge what we deal with. Sometimes there's so few of us working at an organization that we become representative of Native American Women concerning every issue, no matter our personal experiences, or specializations, or politics on representation.
When Boyden said in a recent interview that he should step back and let more deeply-rooted members of the community speak on its behalf -- and that he had become 'a bit too big' of a deal, my immediate reaction was a shrug. His apologies have felt a little flaccid, while criticisms have become strengthened and more expansive concerning ideas and identity.
Joseph Boyden, author of The Orenda, is a figurehead in native literature and was recently scrutinized for his lack of proof concerning his native roots. The questions his identity raises are interesting and necessary, but if he's unwilling to have those conversations publicly, he's holding up progress.
Over his two terms, President Obama has spoken on protecting native land; made campaign promises to change the US-native relations, and declared November as Native American Heritage month, such actions mean very little in due to his inaction on this issue.
He is well within his legal rights to run both the country and his company. There is not a damn thing anyone can do about it. You could argue that it's corrupt, or that it's unethical, but we shouldn't hold our breath waiting for either Donald Trump or Congress to embrace the notion of ethics.
There is a clear problem: hundreds of people of specific populations are killed every year in police interactions. Black Lives Matter is not saying that only their lives matter; they are saying that, historically, their lives have not mattered. They haven't mattered much, nor have Native American lives.
Epidemics of obesity, diabetes, infectious diseases and suicide that plague First Nation children across Canada are complex and multi-faceted. Yet government solutions often focus on simplistic bio-medical approaches -- when they address the crises at all -- and too often ignore the cultural strategies proposed by indigenous leaders.