HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Neil Young

The rocker calls Obama "a better man" in a shot at the U.S. president.
The Canadian rocker can't wait to vote in the 2020 presidential election.
Simple message, really.
It's a bit surprising that the Trump campaign would run afoul of copyright provisions like it has when there are apparently dozens of songs that the rights holders would be more than happy to grant Donald permission to use. Here are just a few examples.
A long time ago, in a Canadian music industry far, far away, the federal government had to step in with CanCon quotas to save our singers and musicians from being buried by radio hits from our southern neighbours. Now I wouldn't be surprised if the U.S. built a Trump wall to keep our artists out.
"It’s tragic.”
There is a distinction between two kinds of rights held by copyright owners: economic rights and moral rights. Any Canadian politicians seeking to use a musical work at a public event should be aware of the legal issues that may arise when a work is directly linked with a political party or message.
Keep on rockin' in the free world, Neil Young urges us — but rockin' at his fabulous Hawaiian estate certainly doesn't come
"I don't feel right allowing this to be sold to my fans. It's bad for my music."