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net neutrality

On net neutrality, Canada and the U.S. are moving in opposite directions.
Let's be clear -- no one who signed up for Ashley Madison has committed a crime or participated in illegal activity. Shouldn't we be channelling our outrage towards a group of hackers for taking it upon themselves to determine what's immoral and what's appropriate conduct on the Internet? Using cyber-terrorism as a tool to shame people who may not navigate by the same moral compass as you is not only the ultimate breach in privacy; it's an attack on net neutrality. Imposing fear on people for how they behave online is just as repressive as restricting certain behaviours and content in the first place.
There's a lot at stake here -- if Canada continues on the path the current government has set it on, then harmful policies on surveillance, Internet censorship, and Big Telecom dominance could be locked in place for a generation, and hold back our digital economy. Canadians deserve better.
Net neutrality is a hotly-debated topic these days, and for a good reason -- it surrounds one of the most pivotal aspects of our daily lives: the Internet.
Bell announced that it completed its $3.2 billion acquisition of CTV on April 1, 2011. Less than four years later, company executives say that their business is unsustainable and effectively admit that they cannot compete. In most sectors, that would be grounds for unhappy shareholders and corporate change. In the Bell world, it means intense lobbying for radical regulatory reform to raise television fees, block content, violate net neutrality, and fight Netflix.
you may not live in the U.S., but many of your favourite websites do. In the end, rules that impact those sites will eventually impact you. And as countries around the world continue to contemplate net neutrality rules, it will be important to show the leadership of Canada's CRTC, the United States' FCC, and others to urge policy-makers around the globe to follow suit.
Calling the practice “unlawful,” Canada’s telecom watchdog has forbidden Bell Media and Videotron from exempting their own
Watch out, telcos: Canada’s telecommunications regulator is now armed and dangerous. As part of a budget implementation bill
"We cannot allow internet service providers to restrict the best access or to pick winners and losers in the online marketplace
The US Federal Communications Commission's proposed internet regulations would, as portrayed, effectively end net neutrality