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netflix house of cards

Well played.
Mark Feb. 27, 2015 in those calendars "House of Cards" fans, because you've got a date with Frank Under — sorry, make that
Ace showrunner Beau Willimon is proving to be quite the Hollywood wild card. Despite being plucked by Hollywood from relative
Last time we were in the "House Of Cards" universe, it seemed like Frank (Kevin Spacey) had it all: he'd successfully made
Sometimes smashing a sink faucet with a hammer is just smashing a sink faucet with a hammer. At other times, as in the finale of House Of Cards' first season, it means a whole lot more. Blunt force might silence a dripping faucet, but it doesn't stop the underlying problem. Frank is surely going to find this out.
In these final episodes of the first season, House Of Cards has that feeling of last-minute panic. Everything is on the verge of crumbling and Frank's future looks bleak. Out of the blue waltzes Major Dad himself -- yes, Gerald McRaney -- and we have yet another wild card in the mix.
For the first 10 episodes of House Of Cards, there has been a layer of secrecy and double-dealing over everything. With Peter's very public implosion, that layer has disintegrated, and the characters on the show have no choice but to reveal their truths. This is the moment before checkmate. It's make-or-break for Frank.
It was bound to happen before long: all of Frank's allies are turning into enemies. Even his beloved Claire, the woman who's stuck by him for decades, has had enough of his lies, his manipulation and his using. For her to break away signifies a major shift in House Of Cards -- could it be that Frank's carefully calculated empire is finally crumbling to dust?
All of our main characters are either rewarded for their bravery or punished for their cowardice in this episode, and we start to see the decline of many relationships we thought were stable, relatively speaking. Tenuous threads of trust are severed as personal interests take precedence over the greater good.
This is a nice character exploration of the two main (male) characters, Frank and Peter. Like Episode 3, this one goes off on a personal tangent, and whisks us away from the grey sameness of D.C. To be honest, this show needs it.