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Publications don't exist unless content creators (i.e. writers) create some content. They deserve to be fairly paid for their work and they deserve to retain the copyright. Most major reputable publications do just that but sadly the numbers are declining.
For the first time in history, a woman will hold the top editorial position at a national Canadian newspaper. Anne Marie
In 2013, one of the most common refrains I heard while selling print ads to small business owners was "We are concentrating on our online advertising". There is no doubt there is, and should be, an upward trend towards owning your online footprint. However, the idea of marketing exclusively online for a brick and mortar business is unwise to say the least. Conversely, an online business should not close their minds to traditional advertising.
In terms of visible minorities, the Globe and Mail is doing no better than its national print-based competitors in providing a forum for ethnic Canadian voices. This diverse demographic is projected to grow to a third of the Canadian population by 2030. Is traditional Canadian media doing anything to include, reflect or address their experiences in the multicultural mosaic, building on the wave of the present and future? The examples are few and far between.
While the outcome is fairly obvious, the question is why did Bezos pay $250 million (he paid $500 million but $250 was its real estate) for the Washington Post? Why didn't he just start offering content deals to publishers and journalists then sell it on Amazon as he does now with movies?
Job cuts, outsourcing, and a paywall push in the face of plunging advertising sales at Canada’s largest-circulation newspaper
If today’s earnings report are anything to go by, Canada’s newspaper business is in serious trouble. Two of the country’s
Print journalism is changing fundamentally. Three dramatic events last week make the point: On October 18, Newsweek magazine announced it will become a digital only publication in 2013, ending 80 years in print. Newspapers have failed, so far, to acquire the skill sets required for print journalism in the 21st century.
Slowly, slowly, the dwindling band of journalists who survive all the cuts are being acclimatized to the notion that their job is no longer to serve the people in our democracy -- a tradition proudly built up over the past couple of hundred years, often at great cost -- but to serve their employer. So why don't we, the people, take over -- subsidize our precious democratic journalism ourselves? Here's the plan.
Conrad Black has been out of the Canadian newspaper game for some time, but he may not be gone for good. Just months after