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newtown

It was then, right then, that the United States of America died. When you can let 20 six- and seven-year-olds be murdered, and do nothing to prevent it from happening ever again, you cease to be a country. You cease to be a people worthy of the name.
Exactly one year ago today, we were driving from Boston to Washington, happily listening to a random program when a news alert interrupted. Unconfirmed reports told us that dozens of students had been killed at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut.
WASHINGTON -- There have been many instances of mass gun violence during the presidency of Barack Obama. Some faded away
Harry Connick Jr. hasn't forgotten about the young victims of the Newtown, Conn. shooting last December and in particular
Those without mental health issues equate their feelings of sadness to those of someone with depression, when in reality this is like comparing a small paper cut to a broken arm. This characterization is entirely misguided however, as mental health issues are not a "First World Problem" but instead a problem which has the potential to affect all humans regardless of class, race, gender, or ethnicity.
Tim Knight writes the regular media column, Watching the Watchdog, for HuffPost Canada. Two hundred and thirty-seven years
It was a fun week. I noticed some celebrity news with Amy and Tina, the Olsen twins looking for more attention, solutions for cold and flu season, help with staying active and more on gun control in the U.S.
What will come of the events at Sandy Hook Elementary School in the coming weeks and months remains to be seen. But in the wake of this and other tragedies, young people have proven that strength, resilience and compassion can prevail. We can bring meaning to these atrocities that seem to negate all that is right in the world.
Nancy Lanza -- mother of Connecticut shooter Adam Lanza -- is dead. And it's not the time and place to criticize her as an anomaly, some sort of freakish survivalist, when in fact she was a participant in a broader gun culture that should be getting our serious attention. When such shootings happen, however, it is far easier to blame one individual woman for being a "bad mother" who created a "monster" than to acknowledge that some aspects of society in general might be bad and in need of changing. Where does the real instability lie?
Being a US citizen, I can't help feeling smug about choosing to live in Canada where the gun culture is not so alive and well, along with a sense of despair about how deeply entrenched it is in the US. But then, being an observer of brands and myths and icons, I wonder why this event had such a powerful impact on me, and on the rest of the world. Of course, it's a lot of people, and mainly children. But why is the killing of "innocent" children so much worse than the killing of thousands of people caught in the violence in Syria? Or young urban males shooting each other every day all over the US? It can only be that we feel those other victims are somehow partly to blame for getting killed.