HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

nfl

Faking it is part of our culture. Soccer players around the globe have been faking it for years -- that is, feigning most-grievous injury where, in fact, not even a light stroke of contact occurred. And in recent years, even the big boys of basketball have taken to faking contact, flopping about on the court like a fish on a dry dock with Oscar-worthy performances.
Inarguably, the quarterback position is the most glamorous in all of sports, certainly in all of football. Uncertain of whether the glamour claim is 100 per cent true? Ah, when was the last time you saw an offensive guard on the cover of a fashion magazine? Never, that's when.
Why would millions of kids walk away from sports which are meant to be fun? Well, the reason is it's not fun, not when Mum and Dad are "Yellers". Children are embarrassed by parents behaving aggressively on the sideline of junior sports event, especially their own. Telling a 16 year-old, "you're not trying hard enough" or, "you'll be cut from the team" is bad enough. But telling a 6 year-old is, surely, unacceptable.
Every year on the Monday after the last Sunday of the regular season, the NFL unofficially holds its annual (seemingly drunken) firing fest as the wise people who hired all these apparently inept people in the first place, conclude at once not that they made horrible hiring decisions. And yet, oddly enough, the league seems to do little to capitalize on all this inherent drama.
It seems more than a bit odd that, according to a probing piece in The New York Times, players do not protect those delicate, tender, highly sought-after jewels. Seriously, though: no cups? That's astonishing. I mean, they wear equipment to protect every other area. Why be more protective of the kidneys than the cookies? More protective of the noggin than the nuggets?
The National Football League has reached the halfway point of the 2012 regular season. It affords self-proclaimed "NFL Insiders" an ideal opportunity to rationalize why all their pre-season predictions are miles off the mark, and to make brand-spanking new bold, brash, altogether insightful, and just-as-inaccurate predictions for the second half of the season.
Okay, so the NFL replacement refs are terrible. Missed calls everywhere. Questionable holding penalties that have decided games. Let's be real here: as awful as it's been, it's always been terrible. How many years have you sat on your couch and screamed at the TV because those Foot Locker employees missed an obvious penalty? How terrible are referees, in general, and across all sports?
When Junior Seau's girlfriend found him dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his home in Oceanside, California, speculation arose over the similarity between his death and the suicides of other NFL stars. Though a recent autopsy report ruled out brain damage and drugs and alcohol in Seau's death, this is just part of a disturbing trend in recent years with former NFL players committing suicide in similar ways, showing that far more needs to be done.
How can it be, I wondered, that the largest, most vibrant city in Canada has difficulty getting a professional team into the playoffs, much less winning all the marbles?
Not only could you guarantee the NFL that all of Ontario would be behind you, and not only would you lap up a significant portion of Canadians that would root for the country's only NFL team, but you're talking about putting an NFL franchise in a city that accounts for one seventh of its entire country.