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nimby

Oregon lawmakers have voted to allow gentle densification in urban and suburban neighbourhoods. For Canada, similar changes may be unavoidable ― and difficult.
There is a need for more supply to satisfy this rapidly rising need for millennial housing, but the demographic logjam created by baby boomers is restricting millennial access to prime properties, keeping them under-housed, stuck living with a roommate or confined to their parents' basements.
It would appear that Naomi Klein and her co-authors are oblivious to what's actually going on in rural Ontario. We are the backyard where all the wind turbines and solar farms are supposed to be built, providing "clean" renewable energy to clueless city dwellers. But guess what? We don't want these installations in our back yard either!
It took four months to go from the tragedy of Newtown to the disgraceful lack of leadership that saw the United States Congress
Newmarket is one of the fastest growing cities in Ontario. Unfortunately, they've now run out of room to grow. Like many other cities, it has no choice but to grow upwards. The trouble is that some local residents are resisting high-density development. What they don't realize is that thanks to the provincial government, they don't have a choice in the matter.
Although NIMBYism can arise out of fear of something different in a community, it can also be the result of genuine concern for the local environment. I'd like to propose a new kind of NIMBY: Let's go green and say yes to Nature in My Backyard.