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Nobel Peace Prize

Jean-François Roberge isn't shying away from the religious symbols ban.
There has been a distilled media narrative involving partisan politics when mentioning him. Lost in all the noise is his incredible humanitarian legacy.
Canada matters. As Malala herself said, "If Canada leads, the world will follow." As a country, we have an opportunity to aid the global women's human rights movements that, at this moment, are more powerful than ever.
I'm not sure who is advising the Black Lives Matter Toronto chapter. Social justice should be about resolving issues that exist and preventing new ones from popping up. Regressive justice and the approach of BLMTO seems to be creating division. They're stepping on others and provoking controversy. Making such outlandish commentary and actions, they become their own worst enemy.
When the Nobel Prize Committee awarded Elie the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 the choice was greeted with international acclaim, for it is difficult to imagine any other person in the world who had so commanded the respect of political leaders and the people themselves. As for myself, Elie has always been my teacher, mentor, role model, inspiration, and friend of 50 years - in a word, the most remarkable human being I have ever encountered.
At this critical time in history, it is more important than ever for us to pause and remember the courageous Elie Wiesel, tireless defender of peace and advocate for the persecuted, repressed and disenfranchised. Wiesel, age 87, died this weekend at his home in New York City.
The number of conflicts -- especially intra-state conflicts -- is on the rise worldwide, contributing to record numbers of forcibly displaced people in 2014. Many of these conflicts are marked by violent extremism and acts of gender-based violence and abuse. The practice and policy of war and security have traditionally been dominated by men. Women and girls are almost always excluded from the political processes that are essential for peace and security: between 1992 and 2011, less than four per cent of signatories to peace agreements and fewer than 10 per cent of negotiators at peace tables were women. Yet, there is solid evidence that women's participation in peace negotiations contributes to more lasting peace.
Today Canadians celebrate Lester Pearson's birthday. Even as we reflect back on the kind of leader he was and the growing capacities of Canada that he helped to create, we become aware that somewhere between then and now we lost our edge, our diversified global influence, and, sadly, our belief in the public good.
The lesser known but long-fighting Satyarthi is a trailblazer for children's rights; Malala is the next generation. She is the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, and at 17, the first teen. This is a profound and long-overdue recognition for the role of youth in changing our world for the better.
Recently, North America awoke to the news that Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who fearlessly advocated for female