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nursing homes

Many of the long-term care industry’s lobbyists are also donors to Doug Ford’s party.
Premier Ford blasted the "ridiculous" policy meant to protect seniors.
If you are in the situation of caring for a loved one and have made a commitment to placing a loved one on a nursing home placement list, be prepared for the vast array of mixed emotions that might arise when you get that much awaited (or dreaded) call. While you may look forward to lightening the burden that has accompanied your caregiving commitments, you may also feel a deep loss, much like grief. This is normal.
Last week, the Ontario Liberal Government released the specifics of the 2017-2018 Budget. From a health care perspective, what became startlingly evident, was that the Liberals seem to be unable to comprehend exactly how the health care system functions. They are seemingly unable or unwilling to look at the big picture when trying to solve problems.
The evidence is clear: Large-scale private equity investments in nursing home facilities too often jeopardize the quality of care and put seniors' health at risk. So what can we do to stop it? Here are some ideas.
Last week, two health care stories in the news that got relatively little attention illustrated exactly what is wrong with the direction health care is taking in Ontario, under the leadership of its hapless Health Minister Eric Hoskins, and beleaguered Premier Kathleen Wynne.
Of the $220 billion spent on health care annually in Canada, 45 per cent is spent on those over 65 years old, although they only represent 15 per cent of the population. It's time we improved the quality and quantity of care delivered for frail Canadians - and improve the health system for everyone in the process.
Placement in long-term care is one of the more difficult decisions facing caregivers of patients with dementia. Let me start by stating that my personal bias is to try and keep my patients at home as long as possible, assuming that their safety and health, as well as the caregiver's health, is compatible with this goal.
In the absence of systematic evidence, anecdotes rule the day. Unusual cases of negligence, tragic rare events, and exceptional health system failures have been the fodder for media sensationalism triggering anxiety in the hearts of bureaucrats, health care managers and the general public.
Those of us in the industry who are committed to providing quality seniors' housing and care -- many of whom also deal with the reality of aging parents -- believe that there is a long overdue conversation that Canadians should be having with their families.