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obamacare

Other than driving doctors to activism that might even send them north across the border, threats to the Canadian system as a result of the Trump agenda relate less to the repeal of Obamacare and more to his intention to renegotiate NAFTA.
I am not surprised in the slightest that Trump wasted no time in taking the preliminary steps to get rid of Obamacare, to build the wall along the Mexico - U.S. Border and to ban Muslims. It's exactly what he said he'd do throughout his entire campaign. In fact, I would have been shocked if he'd backed away from any of it, or even waited for the Obama's plane to take off for Palm Springs before getting started.
I'm just going to come right out and say it: I think Americans have a lot to be concerned about unless, among other things, they don't care about their freedom to choose and their basic human rights. Have you been paying attention to Donald Trump's nominees? Do you know what they believe in and stand for? I have been keeping up with his picks and their platforms. And let me tell you, unless I was an affluent, white, heterosexual, conservative Christian man, I'd be more than a little nervous.
Remember Donald Trump's campaign speeches when he was the Republican presidential candidate? All those promises he made? How his supporters lapped it all up? How loudly they cheered? How madly they waved their placards and signs? How riled up they got?
IUDs can last up to 12 years
"Even on its worst day the Canadian health-care system is pretty good."
This week the country's 14 health ministers have been gathering in Vancouver for a pan-Canadian summit to begin negotiating a new health accord. The previous accord saw $41 billion transferred to the provinces over the last decade. This next one may be even bigger.
The first White House state dinner in 19 years for a Canadian leader will be happening right in the heat of primary season.
"Ridiculous," the New Jersey resident says. "A headache," he says. "We were pretty much forced to get it," he says. And yet
Yes, we do ration healthcare in America. It's just that those affected the most are those who have the least income. In America, we have become oddly blasé about income inequality and its consequences, increasingly willing to let those without simply do without. But the mere hint that a needs -- or evidence-based -- process might be used to allocate scarce or high-priced healthcare raises an outcry from those accustomed to getting what they want, when they want it.