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occupy movement

As humans, we need to sleep. It is a biologically unavoidable act. Yet, on both sides of the border, "sleeping" can be considered a criminal act, especially if you are homeless and have no place to rest your head other than in public spaces such as parks. How have cities and states been able to impose and enforce by-laws and ordinances that clearly violate one's right to occupy public space for this very purpose? This summer several cases are putting this longstanding question to the legal test. The outcome might just change the way we view homelessness.
The rich have gotten richer, but the poor have gotten richer too. Wages have not stagnated. The decline of the middle class that you might have heard about is not due to people earning less and so becoming lower class. The middle class has shrunk because more of us are earning an upper class income.
Much has been discussed concerning the increasing political polarization occurring globally. From the rise of the Occupy
Strikes, picket lines and other forms of protest that require significant labour resources are ineffective against corporations that can use automation or outsourcing as significant bargaining chips. If this is the case, how are activists meant to effect real change? One way is in the corporate boardroom.
I wonder: since when did "Merry Christmas" become a political statement especially in multicultural Canada? Multiculturalism is a complete and utter failure in Canada when it is politically incorrect to say "Merry Christmas" without pausing and wondering if they may or may not be offended?
In the Minotaurs press shot, the sprawling afrobeat band born in Guelph, Ontario is crowded towards camera, decked out in
#Ottawapiskat has been trending on Twitter with a fervour few other hashtags have generated. Aaron Paquette, a First Nations artist from Edmonton, says he started the hashtag to raise questions about the double standards that First Nations people often face in the media.
Recently, I heard a Grade 6 student explain that he and his friends had walked out of school to protest against a government measure that they believed had resulted in their teachers' rights being taken away. The principal was not impressed. I think we should be very impressed. What are our children in Canada seeing in the streets of our cities and towns? Idle No More, Occupy, protests in Ontario and Quebec by teachers and students -- and remember the G-20 protests in Toronto in 2010? While some of us looked the other way, the children are still watching.
The fifth of November is a day celebrated by radicals who generally do not understand its historical significance. Most of them see the Guy Fawkes masks and the Gunpowder Plot, popularized by the film V for Vendetta, as a symbol of freedom and a blow against tyranny. This is wrong.
At a time when jumpstarting a mob is as easy as creating a new Facebook group or signing the latest petition, any disinterest in political activism might seem just careless, apathetic, and even lazy. But the lack of an "off-gridders of the world" organization seems to me to speak to a completely different sense of involvement and an alternative way of doing politics. Our homes -- our grid-connected homes -- are intertwined to one another through extensive lines.