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Omnibus Budget Bill

The federal government announced it will close the world-renowned Experimental Lakes Area in Southern Ontario in 2013. It's an odd decision, especially considering that it costs just $2-million a year to operate -- one-tenth the cost of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's security detail and about the same amount the government spent during the 2010 G20 Summit in Toronto to build a tourism pavilion with a fake lake.
While there are notable differences between the Canadian Conservatives and U.S. Tea Party Republicans, both nonetheless represent a new brand of conservatism that make predecessors seem like moderates (or even progressives).
In the coming days, the world's leaders will gather in Rio de Janeiro to seek renewed commitment to the principles of sustainable development. The Rio+20 hasn't received a lot of Canadian attention, and for good reason: A federal budget bill which contains over 100 pages dedicated to weakening environmental legislation and oversight has just been passed by parliament.
Green Party Leader Elizabeth May is challenging Tory MPs to prove their knowledge of their government's sweeping budget implementation
This hydra-headed Trojan horse budget implementation bill -- where the open-ended omnibus character masks its stealth-like impact -- will have prejudicial fallout in nearly every conceivable domain. Simply put, this legislation and the process of its implementation represents an affront to all Canadians, and Canadians should be appalled by it.
OTTAWA - Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page is warning the federal government that 64 departments and agencies have
Parliament has never seen such an all-encompassing bill as C-38 in its history. The government has shut down debate in Parliament and refuses to split the bill to allow for proper scrutiny. Ultimately, whether this terrible bill passes or not depends on the mettle of individual Conservative MPs.
MPs have been burning the candle at both ends as they vote on a deluge of amendments to the Conservatives' controversial
On Monday, May 14, parliament will vote on whether to give it second reading and send it to committee. Despite vociferous opposition calls for splitting the current 400-page bill to deal separately with issues, Conservative House Leader Peter Van Loan flatly refused, saying that the government wants its economic program passed quickly.