online

Young people are obsessed with colours, food is colourful, which means it creates great still shots. Millennials aren't obsessed with food as much as they are taking pictures of it for social engagement. Since smartphone owners and purchasers of photo editing apps and filters are still dominated by youngins, it's almost impossible for this generation to not be able to take salivating photos, upload them to social media and connect with the rest of the world. Social media is changing the way they eat, maybe even the way we non-millennials eat.
The media on both sides of the political aisle may well be painting a picture of what they want to see happen, not what is an accurate prediction of what could happen. And because we all willingly are consuming and sharing media as we always have been, we are confident in our own views of the likely outcome.
Even if you've been chatting on various dating apps such as Tinder or Zoosk, meeting an actual human being in the flesh is completely different than online banter. The skills that make us good at online communication don't translate into the real world, and "relationships" online can have very little to do with real-life connections.
There have been countless times in 2015 that I've wanted to post something and didn't bother. Occasionally these posts can be found in my drafts but most often they are deleted. Why do I let this happen? Surely someone must care for what I have to say? But then I think again.
Tech giants like Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb have entered unchartered policy territory where ethics debates, grey areas and government relations are the daily norm. While the seeming nuisance of having to deal with all these new policy implications all at once may seem cumbersome, the economic benefits and progress that has been made far outweigh the work.
I've been a pollster for 40 years. Internet polling enables us to explore subjects once very difficult, if not impossible, to cover via telephone surveys. Further, online polling provides opportunities to put video and photos in front of people for truer reactions.
Business leaders so desperately want to understand how the brain works in order to improve their bottom line such that they will invest oodles of cash in the offerings of digital companies that claim to have neuroscientific validity. And an article about "going viral" in Harvard Business Review by a best-selling author and esteemed academic from Harvard will, by definition, go viral.
I stopped journalling because I got online. I don't think that's a bad thing, but I am realizing that reconnecting, thinking how to package myself and my experiences in a palatable way, and "making memories" is getting in the way of actually living them. That is the one thing that today's technology has taught me. I may be able to get information and companionship instantly, but it doesn't mean that I should.
It's a brave new world in which we're living and digital technology has upped the ante in the parenting realm. As parents of younger children as well as tweens and adolescents, we have to take the digital world seriously. Our children's safety is at stake.
You may have noticed variations of the term "online trolling" creeping their way into the style guides of your favourite news outlets over the past year. What the Internet need not attempt is to expunge trolls. Instead, the digital class must work towards a renegotiation of its idioms. A key part of this process will be coaxing more nuance from terms like trolls and trolling, insisting on new ways of delineating the undesirable from the criminal: the process from the by-product. Resist the rush to concede the perch of the troll; it's all many of us have left.