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Ontario Economy

The government is also giving seniors a tax credit for renovations to make their homes safer.
The $14-an-hour minimum wage didn't derail Ontario's job market, but for young workers, things are tougher out there.
By 2017/18, the government expects that over 10 cents of every revenue dollar collected by Queen's Park will go to servicing past debt rather than public services that Ontarians care about such as health care and education or tax relief that improves the province's tax competitiveness.
The foundations of Ontario’s job market are turning into quicksand that threatens to swallow the province’s economic future
Canada’s regional economic divide isn’t going anywhere, but it will narrow a little in the coming year thanks to slightly
Lakehead University economics prof Livio Di Matteo has put out a very interesting graph breaking down job growth in Ontario
If Ontario PC Leader Tim Hudak’s proposal to create a million new jobs weren’t already thoroughly discredited, this might
The results do not bode well for Ontario. Provincial debt amounts to 237.7 per cent of revenue -- the highest ratio amongst the provinces. In other words, the total debt accumulated by the Ontario government represents almost two and a half years of revenues. Ontario's ratio is much higher than Quebec, the second most indebted province (189.5 per cent) on this metric.
The analysis of one of Canada's leading banks incorrectly concludes Ontario can't be compared to California, should be compared to other provinces, isn't necessarily at fault for being the second most indebted province, and argues the federal government should consider bailing Ontario out. No wonder Ontario is in the state it's in.
These challenges facing Ontario are well documented. Yet the government's policy direction is not moving in the right direction. Recent developments suggest that the government intends to continue growing spending on the types of policies that have contributed to the problem such as high deficits and a new round of corporate subsidies.