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ontario election

In the 2010 election the Conservatives had a 15 per cent plurality over the Liberal candidate. In 2014, that dropped to about nine per cent. A return to a 15 per cent plurality, or even close to that, would certainly be an indication that Ms. Wynne's government is getting progressively more unpopular.
The government already spends 9.2 per cent of its revenues to service its debt and, according to its own estimates, this will rise to nearly 11 per cent in the next four years. Put plainly, Ontario spends $1 out of every $10 sent to Queen's Park to pay for past debt. This is money not spent on health care, education, transportation, or other public priorities. The increase in rates and the expectation for further hikes means even more tax revenues will go to paying interest instead of key government services.
The provincial election in Ontario last week saw the highest-ever number of voters choose "none of the above," according
Naturally, candidates draft campaign platforms to suit likely voters. My concern lies in the potential effect of removing these groups from the conversation altogether. If young people do not see their views, priorities or issues emerging in campaign conversation, this will add a significant barrier to the already daunting task of engaging youth participation.
Toronto's and Ontario's cash cow -- banking -- is going to face increasingly rough seas. This won't happen immediately, but a steadily downward trajectory affecting profits and employment is clear. At a recent high-level conference in New York on the future of finance, the news was great for consumers but grim for the world's bankers.
Maybe the paper spent all its time prepping for a Hudak victory and was forced to plagiarize itself in a mad rush to get
With her victory Thursday night, Kathleen Wynne became the first openly gay premier elected in Canadian history. Yet, as
Doug Ford thinks he knows the cure for what ails the Ontario Progressive Conservatives and won't rule out making a run at
The newest hot trend in the trying-so-hard-not-to-expend-one-iota-of-independent-self-guided-research crowd is declining your vote. In less than 24 hours all manner of articles have sprung up that read like the person writing them caught a case of spontaneous narcolepsy when forced to talk about the election. Nobody is going to argue the fact that the Ontario party leaders we've been presented with this time around come across as flat and less than engaging, but when was it ever going to be an option that Hudak's lifeless floating grin be the one I could hold accountable were something to happen to me in my own neighbourhood? Did everyone forget how our political system works?