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ontario government

Ontario's plan to prevent rent increases in 2021 was criticized by both landlord and tenant groups.
Ontario should display the social and environmental costs of oil consumption at gas stations.
Labour laws across this country have not kept up with the times. Written when most jobs were full time, and people could stay in one job to build a career and a life for their families, today's laws cannot adequately address the needs of workers in increasingly precarious temporary work and contract positions.
By Wayne Karl Bryan Tuckey was on fire. Speaking at the Toronto Real Estate Board's (TREB) recent Market Year in Review & Outlook
As cities across Ontario try to squeeze out savings to expand public transit, something doesn't add up. Too many cities, including Toronto, are missing out on hundreds of millions in savings. That's because Ontario has a labour law loophole that's putting cities, companies and taxpayers at a huge disadvantage.
Both in terms of formal programs and corporate philosophy, genuine sponsorship is known to be effective at accelerating careers; but, unlike more established mentorship programs, is not at all widely used.
Much as the manual transmission has all but disappeared in the 21st Century, the idea of driving a car in the manner of a Steve McQueen may soon also be a thing of the past. Autonomous features will almost assuredly become mandatory -- and switching them off could become a too-expensive option.
Premier Wynne has removed the "net zero" requirement from government employee contract bargaining, effectively re-opening the floodgates of wage increases for bureaucrats and other unionized government employees. Here's what that means for Ontarians.
The LCBO is hoping to cash in on marijuana sales. The dubious reasoning being that they, and only they, are capable of handling the burdensome task of quenching the insatiable thirst of millions of Ontarian adults -- so obviously they and only they are responsible enough to distribute marijuana. Too bad Ontarians don't view it this way.