HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Ottawa

As David Cameron once said, it is "better to mend broken states and act to stop problems before they come to our door." His words resonate because we have come to understand that peace is not just the absence of war, but also the presence of social and economic justice.
Non-violent resistance, or civil disobedience, has been with us for centuries and has shaped the world in which we live today. Those who chose to risk arrest on Parliament Hill are not the extremists. They are the front line of a growing group of people prepared to engage in "the politics of ordinary people."
Right now, the biggest threat on Mr. Harper's horizon is the state of the economy. The global economy could get a lot worse between now and the next election and there's no assurance that Canada will be spared, even relatively.
Credit is due to the Ottawa government for having picked Ms. Tarbox as their new poster child. But for every Barb Tarbox, there is a James Dean. For every death statistic, there is a hero, real or fictitious who has beaten the odds and has come out on top.
Maybe British Prime Minister David Cameron will light a policy fire under the Harper government while he's in Ottawa. His Big Society idea challenges citizens to get Big Government out of the way. But putting cost-cutting and community empowerment side-by-side can produce the perfect storm of political opportunism.
Once upon a time, policy-making was about finding the best ideas to solve a problem. Today, policy process is no longer about finding the best ideas. It is mainly about managing different interest groups, many of whom are in a position to derail a process they don't like.
The Conservatives found another way to recognize former Progressive Conservative prime minister John Diefenbaker Monday when
The Conservative government will introduce sweeping justice reforms Tuesday with a massive omnibus bill it hopes to pass
The Ottawa man who was struck by lightning and killed Sunday morning at a campsite east of the city is 26-year-old Ryan Snutch
A Libyan-Canadian neurosurgeon freed from a Tripoli prison by anti-Gadhafi rebels last month said he is lucky to be alive