Pacific Northwest LNG

The company blames low energy prices and a shifting business landscape.
B.C. politics already has its dark money donations that are difficult to trace back to an actual donor. But the free for all when it comes to political fundraising in the province has given rise to another murky practice: raising campaign cash from some dark corners of the world.
Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says the project underwent a three-year rigorous and thorough science-based process.
The federal government's approval of the Pacific NorthWest LNG project has been presented as a positive outcome for industry and government, and a negative one for First Nations. The simple truth is, not all First Nations are opposed to the project. In fact, many along the project's route are in favour, and here's why
As a progressive voter, it was disappointing to watch the press conference announcing the federal approval of Petronas' Pacific Northwest LNG project, an industrial project that would trample the rights and title of First Nations and make it virtually impossible for B.C. to meet greenhouse gas emission targets.
Don't get me wrong: B.C. truly is a glorious place -- the type of place you can fly over in a seaplane and easily think the wilderness will never end. But it's also one of the world's last frontiers and the race is on to cut down our old-growth forests, to send more oil tankers into our ports, to build natural gas plants in our salmon estuaries and to flood our rivers for megadams.
MaryAnn Mihychuk's officials told her it was inevitable that companies would need temporary foreign workers to proceed with energy projects in Western Canada.
If consumers in Asia use British Columbian LNG, the global emissions will be 20 per cent lower than LNG from our competitors. If this LNG replaces coal, the global benefit is even greater as it will produce less than half the emissions of a comparable coal plant. In both cases, B.C. LNG is better for the planet than the alternatives.
The report is "a symbol of what is wrong with environmental decision-making in Canada."
The premier was fielding questions about opposition to TPP, tax breaks for the mining industry, and environmental concerns over LNG projects.