HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Panama Papers

The majority of Canada's current wealthiest families didn't earn their fortunes, but had them passed down, from as far back as six generations.
The bread price-fixing scheme is a moment when the curtain is pulled back and we get a peek into how things really work.
For millions of women around the world living in poverty, every dollar of lost revenue sets them further back
It is outrageous enough that wealthy clients got off with a slight reprimand. KPMG has, so far, paid no price for their role. The committee let Canadians down by not recommending a full investigation into this case and laying charges against KPMG if the evidence warrants it. And Canadians are right to keep demanding one.
According to recent media reports based on the Panama Papers, some see Canada as a tax haven. It may seem unlikely when you are reviewing how much tax you paid to the government in 2016 but evidently, our reputation and economy is a good venue for hiding wealth.
Criminal investigations are "ongoing," CRA says.
In regards to tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) should be part of the solution. At the moment, it rather seems to be part of the problem. Over the last few years, we have seen that the CRA institutionalized various practices, eroding the trust that Canadians place in it.
Last April, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists revealed the "Panama Papers" scandal, a database of
Royal Bank of Canada was there, too.
The impact of not being honest and truthful from the beginning can be devastating to a company's reputation, and in some cases, their entire business. As a result, we've seen established organizations attempt to appease their customers by pre-emptively disclosing information that never would have been released in the past.