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Parents How-To

Marc and Craig Kielburger are the co-founders of Free The Children and Me to We, a social enterprise. They are authors of
Marc and Craig Kielburger are the co-founders of Free The Children and Me to We, a social enterprise. They are authors of
We have seen kids harming themselves due to cyberbullying when they do not put themselves out there. Now, they are asking for the ridicule. As parents, how do we help them to make better choices and control some of this?
The thing is, most of the time teens are fine with not being listened to by their parents. But here's the problem: What happens when you really need them to? You see, all your training in getting them to ignore you isn't going to come in handy. You're, like, the kid who yelled woof! Or barked, or something.
As a parent, my first instinct was to get mad at the parent who brought my son's bad behaviour to my attention. But then I realized killing the messenger was not the right course of action. Teaching my son a valuable lesson in appropriate conduct was.
It often seems that being a teen is about hearing all things you cannot do, should not do or would not do. This can feel
In an ideal world, your child would choose the nicest, most polite, smartest and best-behaved kid to be her new best friend. Wouldn't that be just dandy? Well, you've probably figured out that this utopian parenting fantasy is just that -- an unrealistic dream that has likely never occurred in the history of human kind.
Whether your daughter asks about shaving, getting her period, wearing makeup or having sex, you should be thoughtful and understanding even if you are uncomfortable. Do not change the subject, make her feel ashamed for asking, or tell her she is too young for such talk.
Every parent is unique, but we all share a common goal before we go tits-up: To die with no regrets. (Other than the regret of accidentally swallowing that rat poison that's now killing us.) And that pursuit -- or avoidance, rather -- is a complicated thing.
Jan. 1 has come and gone. The membership to that expensive gym has never been used because you had the flu, the no-carbs diet was impossible and your kids are still eating in front of the TV even though you promised yourself that would stop. How can you really make changes, not just for you but for your family?