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Real Talk

If you're looking for ways to boost fertility in 2014, you may be surprised how some of your habits may be getting in the
For women hoping to conceive, experts advise watching your weight and following a Mediterranean-style diet to boost your
The war against gluten, the problem with bacon, teens and social media, a sad kid at the zoo and apple season all caught my attention this week.
I was diagnosed with infertility about five months into trying when I realized I was not regularly ovulating and thus began our 14 month struggle to get pregnant. There are some phrases I heard a few times over during my struggle with infertility and found less than helpful.
For years now, ever since the Assisted Human Reproduction Act became law back in 2004 and prohibited the purchase of donor gametes from a donor or a person acting on behalf of a donor, most donor sperm used in Canada has been imported via the U.S. or other countries. The problem? Here it is: at this point, most egg banks in the U.S. offer only anonymously donated eggs. To make a long story short, whether or not this is legal is a nuanced answer where the devil is in the details but suffice it to say that I think it is possible to carefully work within the confines of the AHRA to import ova into Canada in a legal manner.
It was a chilly but clear evening (-35 degrees Celsius) when we got on the tour bus in Whitehorse, Yukon. The tour was for the viewing of the spectacular northern lights, an atmospheric phenomenon that is best viewed under certain environmental conditions during certain periods of the year at certain locations in the northern hemisphere.
How old is too old to be a new mother? In the latest installment of our "Change My Mind" series, HuffPost asked two experts in the field of the bioethics of fertility to debate the statement: It's time to drop upper age limits on fertility treatments. Arguing for the "agree" side is Sara Cohen, a fertility law lawyer based in Toronto. Her practice focuses on legal issues surrounding fertility treatments including IVF, egg donation and embryo donation. Arguing for the "disagree" side is Francoise Baylis, Canada Research Chair in Bioethics and Philosophy at Dalhousie University. What do you think?
You're 28; You're single; You're having fun. Should you have your fertility checked? If you hope to one day have children, the answer is: yes. Understanding the risks of delaying child bearing is important, as is knowing the details of your own particular fertility health. Here are a few tips.
There is nothing less romantic or erotic than getting busy with the end goal of producing something that wears poopy diapers. "Trying" is really, well, trying. Anyone who thinks it's "the fun part" has never had to turn it into work -- relentless, scheduled, no-matter-how-tired-you-are, get-up-at-5:30a.m.-before-you-go-to-work, work -- which is then charted on graph according to basal body temperature.
Often when I tell people that my partner and I aren't sure if or when we'll start a family, the same few questions arise. Can you imagine yourself 20 or 30 years down the road, with no children or grandchildren? Don't you want someone to carry on your family's lineage? Won't it be lonely with just you two?
About Real Talk
HuffPost Canada brings you the latest stories about the reality of fertility and parenthood.