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paris attacks

Things move at such a drunken, furious pace in the social media world that Trump's own press secretary cited this tragedy as proof that a ban on Muslim countries was sensible. Of course, this was still when a witness was being reported as the suspect. And by "suspect" I mean "guilty terrorist," naturally.
Nov. 13 marked the one-year anniversary of the Paris attacks, where 130 individuals lost their lives as several Islamic State (ISIS) militants brought an onslaught of violence and chaos. The bloodshed and terror was a symbolic and ruthless attack against the western world, as Paris is the epitome of occidental culture, and has represented western ideals since the French Revolution in the 18th century.
In recent years, we've seen terror attacks like the one last Tuesday become the norm. From attacks in Brussels and Paris to Turkey, Jakarta and even here in Canada, the global terror threat affects everyone -- and both Muslims and non-Muslims are not immune to it.
In the present trying times, one extremist group after another rears its ugly head. This includes the Taliban, Al-Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al-Shabaab, and the most recent incarnation ISIS. Yet, my colleagues at Universalist Muslims and I refuse to let go of Islam.
"Do good to those who hate you. Bless those who curse you. Pray for those who hurt you." This verse, objectively radical given its relevance today, is particularly applicable in the context of terrorist violence, where strangers are willing to viciously stab, shoot and murder total strangers. One need only think back to the Paris attacks and ask: how can such hatred be justified?
Suddenly, I became aware that this comment thread had opened a window for me into the American ideal of freedom and how virulently many Americans support the First Amendment without any consideration of the violence that hate speech causes. I realized that the concepts of inclusivity, diversity and multiculturalism that I had studied were not the first things on these people's minds. I began to think that these concepts didn't figure into their equation at all.
HuffPost Canada bloggers bring unique and thoughtful perspectives to the events that shape our world, adding an important depth to the online discussion. So to toast the end of another year, we look back at some of the most notable blogs we published in 2015.
Leaders of the mosque are donating more than $100,000 to a local women's shelter and a children's charity.
Why aren't more Muslims living in the West actively speaking out against a series of terror acts inspired by Islamic State ideology? Are the press releases against such acts released by traditional Islamic centres enough to show our solidarity with our neighbours? These are the questions in my mind.
The lessons of Afghanistan were purchased at a bitter cost: the war claimed more lives, more years, and more money than any other campaign in NATO's history. Unless the alliance takes those lessons to heart, a war in Syria and Iraq to extinguish Daesh -- the self-styled "Islamic State" -- will be worse. In any military campaign against Daesh, how will we identify effective allies on the ground, who are less pernicious than our common enemy? How will we ensure that neither chaos nor tyranny fill the vacuum left after a successful campaign? Whom will Syrians be able to trust to rebuild their country?