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paris attacks

The coordinated killings that rocked Paris over the weekend are an unspeakable horror. But we must not allow the horrific nature of this atrocity to drag Canada back into the racism, Islamophobia and war-mongering that characterized our last government. The burden to hold firm on the change that we demanded in the October election is jointly shared between Canadians and our Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
The attacks in France — in particular the response of police and the military — have made a big impression on potential recruits.
Yaser Louati said French Muslims could not take responsibility for "someone who just claims to be Muslim."
"They might have guns, but we have flowers."
"They cannot separate us."
Shirdon was last known to be in Raqqa, Syria.
For Trudeau, the reality of jumping from the skillet of an election campaign into the fire of world diplomacy and emergency response must be something of a foreboding transition. And yet he has brought an aura of freshness and innovation to the G20 that likely couldn't come at a better time.
As ethnic refugees flee a new, if smaller, globally ambitious death cult, the anti-Semitic attitudes of the late-30s are back with a new Islamic target.
Three days before the Paris attacks, Belgium’s Interior Minister, Jan Jambon, warned the world that terrorists have a potentially
When we think of terrorism, we don't think of how it throws us off our axis; how it makes us question everything we think we know about safety and the well being of human kind. We think about the immediate pain caused. We are emotional; we are in tears, we are enraged with the injustice of innocent lives lost. We struggle to understand why. We struggle to get others to engage, but our only goals should be compassion and empathy.