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paris climate conference

Unlike Trump, Trudeau will announce with great fanfare he takes climate change seriously. But just as suddenly, he does exactly what Trump would do -- all the while pointing at Trump backing out of the Paris Summit and getting the media to shame him.
Sure, I'll admit it. And, I'd also add that Justin doesn't have the kind of temperament as Trump, and Trudeau lacks the overt, brute power of the post-fact machinations of an American sized, propaganda machine. But be careful here. It's exactly that sort of reasoning that makes fascism so dangerous. Mesmerized by the most extreme perpetrators, we can then unconsciously ignore egregious abuses of democracy by more "normal," even cuddly-appearing leaders.
The Liberal government plans to bring the Paris agreement on greenhouse gas emissions to the House of Commons for debate
Climate change is no longer "a scientific curiosity" but a "growing crisis."
Canada fell woefully short of 2012 emissions targets and in December 2011 became the only country to pull out of Kyoto, the world's only binding climate treaty. That was in the dark decade of Stephen Harper. Prime Minister Trudeau led a younger, far more optimistic and enlightened entourage to Paris.
I am really confused by my government right now, because when it comes to climate action, it feels like I have two different governments. One government is in Paris, and their words on climate sound like the kind of ambition we need. The other one is in Ottawa, and its actions are looking more and more like the Harper government's on climate change.
Curbing fossil fuel use, China's leaders understand, would dampen its already faltering growth and provide an existential threat to their rule. While they may talk a good game at the UN's Paris talks, they will make no binding commitments to reduce C02.
It is a sad coincidence that Maurice Strong has died on the eve of another ambitious attempt, this time in Paris, to come to grips with global environmental crises that have become ever more grave. We can only hope that a reinvigorated diplomatic corps inspired by fresh political leadership will once again do our country proud.
It has become clear that climate change will disproportionately impact the world's most vulnerable because they are heavily dependent on resources that will be affected by climatic change. Whether by virtue of socio-economic status, conflict, gender or geography, certain groups are more liable than others to be negatively impacted by climate change, which directly implicates the question of human rights. How will this differentially influence people's lives, living conditions and livelihoods, and who are the most vulnerable?
It's encouraging that our newly elected federal government has agreed to improve efforts to safeguard Canada's oceans. Ocean protection here is shamefully deficient, currently at around one per cent. Weak ocean protection hinders our coasts' ability to remain resilient in the face of many challenges.